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TCM Knowledge, TCM Concept, TCM Massage, Acupuncture Massage Therapy, Acupuncture Therapist
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TCM: Traditional Chinese Medicine
Traditional Chinese Medicine, also known as TCM, includes a range of traditional medicine practices originating in China. Although well accepted in the mainstream of medical care throughout East Asia, it is considered an alternative medical system in much of the Western world.

Western Medicine is the best solution for acute conditions. However, for treatment of chronic conditions, most modern people are preferring green and safe medicine and this tendency is becoming more and more prominent. Western medicine, which is based upon chemical materials and its side effects are sometimes stronger than the therapeutic roles, could not meet the demands of this new tendency. While traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is based upon natural plants, and its comprehensive and flexible treatment strategies always bring about fantastic treatment result. So more and more people in the world are interested in TCM, and TCM is becoming a major medical stream in the world.

As an important part of Chinese traditional culture, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has evolved into an unique and complete medical system that is available to the modern world.
It is not merely symptomatic medicine, for when correctly applied, a patient is first holistically assessed for an underlying pattern of imbalance. In general, the techniques of TCM are Chinese Herbal Medicine, Acupuncture, Moxibustion, Herbology, Tuina Massage, Cupping, Gua Sha, Qi Gong, etc. TCM originated from the summarization of experience of the ancient Chinese people in their struggle against diseases and it also has been tested by the long history of China.

In China there are many secret effective formulas circulating among average people. Some of them have been verified, through clinical experiment, as very effective in treating complicated and difficult diseases, for which even Western medicine is at the end of its resources.

Chinese Herbal Medicine (TCM) is an ancient system of health care , Health is more than just the absence of disease, and Chinese Medicine recognises this with its unique capacity to harmonise and enhance our capacity for enjoyment fulfillment and happiness.

Benefits :
Traditional Chinese medicine offers the following benefits:
It is believed by some to treat certain chronic illnesses more effectively than Western medicine.
It is holistic; all aspects of the person
It treats the root cause of the disease as well as the manifest symptoms. Chinese practitioners distinguish between the root (ben) of an illness and its branches (biao). The root is the basic pattern of imbalance in the patient’s qi; the branches are the evident symptoms.

Taoism       We suggest that you order to view DVD of Chinese Medicine: A Taoist Approach to Health via Netflix.com Start Your 1 Month Free Trial here.
Taoism (Daoism) was the first indigenous philosophy of China.   The origin of acupuncture is Chinese Taoism.

The word Tao means “The Way”.   At it’s heart, Taoism presents a harmonious way of living created by balancing the natural forces of “Yin” and “Yang”. Yin-Yang is a symbolic representation of universal process that portrays a changing rather than a static picture of reality. All parts of reality as we observe it can be classified under the title of being Yin or Yang.  Here are a few simplified examples:

Yin is cold                                                                              Yang is hot
Yin is empty                                                                           Yang is full
Yin is wet                                                                               Yang is dry
Yin is dark                                                                              Yang is bright
Yin moves inward                                                                    Yang moves outward
Yin is more female                                                                   Yang is more male

The harmony and balance of these forces are what Taoists believe create a healthy, fulfilling and peaceful life.  A life with these forces out of balance creates disease, chaos, and death.
The writings that were the foundation from which early Taoist practices and philosophy were built came from three sources. Lao Tzu who is said to be the author of The Tao Te Ching, Huang Ti, who wrote The Yellow Emperor’s Internal Medicine Classic, and Ko Hung the author of Pao P’u Tzu. Over the years these writings have been interpreted in many different ways leading to a division of sects, schools and divergent practices.  The more traditional schools recognized three distinct practices in Taoism

1. The Long History
China is one of the oldest civilizations in recording and has a glorious history of 5000 years.

The practice of Chinese medicine also has a long and glorious history. Long ago, the people of China have developed the traditional practical of Chinese medicine in order to survive against nature’s harshest obstacles. Theories in Chinese medicine come from the analysis and constant advancements based on experience and practice.  As early as more than 2000 years ago, china’s oldest recorded collection of Chinese traditional medicinal theories was published.

1300 years ago in 659 C.E, the Tang government published its own book on Chinese medicinal herbs. This was the first government issued Chinese pharmacopoeia, and also the first national pharmacopoeia in the world. In 713C.E, the Japanese government collected this book as part of the curriculum when training to practice medicine in Japan.
Over the past 2000 years, practitioners of medicine in all dynasties have advanced and completed  many theories and books on Chinese medicine.

In the past century, as Western medicine populated through the oriental, there is now a balance and interconnection between Chinese and Western medicine. They both have their strengths and the combination to mankind as a whole.

Chinese medicine is a very important component of Chinese culture. Over the millennia, it has been proven to be enormously effective, rich with culture, unique in its methodologies, organized in its theories and broad in its history. Chinese medicine is a giant in the field of medicine and is a common treasure to the world.Chinese medicine still thrives after so many centuries and along with modern medicine creates unique and advantageous qualities that Chinese medicine possesses. TCM practices include such treatments as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and both Tui na and Shiatsu massage. Qigong and Taijiquan are also closely associated with TCM. Major theories include; Yin-yang,
the Five Phases, the human body Meridian/Channel system, Zang Fu organ theory, six confirmations, four levels, etc.

2.Basic Concepts
(1) Yin and Yang
Yin and Yang are opposing concepts in early Chinese philosophy. Ancient thinkers saw everything as having two opposing sides and used the concept of yin and yang to explain opposing forces and powers in worldly phenomena.  This concept was applied to medicine to explain the different structures, physiologies, and diseases of the human body.
(2) The Five Elements
The Five Elements refer to the five elements which are believed to be found in all things existent. These are: metal, wood, water, fire and soil. This study’s main application in the medicine is using its qualities to explain the movements and changes of the human body under normal and diseased conditions.
(3) Organs and presentation
This is a unique methodology of study in Chinese medicine. It utilizes similar terms as Western medicine but refer to entirely different things. This branch emphasizes on collective changes in a system rather than changes in its specific parts.
(4) Jing-Luo
In Chinese medicine, JIng-Luo is a unique network within the human body. It is different from any one of the networks described in Western medicine (such as the nervous system , circulation system, lymphatic system, etc).Almost all of the acupuncture points which are utilized in Chinese medicine are located within this system.
(5) Chi, Blood and Fluids
Chi is understood as the most essential and basic component of human life. You can say that it is the extraordinary and air moving through the body. Blood is self explanatory. It is vital to life, well-being, and nutrition to the body. Fluids are the collective name for all bodily fluids. Just like blood, it is a vital part of the body.

3.Basic Features
Chinese medicine is a unique branch of medicine practice and has two basic features. One is its through of the body as a totality, and the other is its ability to diagnose according to symptoms only.
(1) The Body as a Totality
The body is a totality and functions on a whole.    Man is imminent to and one with nature.
(2) Diagnosis through Observation
Diagnosis within the Chinese medicinal practice uses only four method (look, listen, ask and touch). With deep analysis, it is observed that similar diseases present different symptoms at different stages and different disease sometimes present the similar stages. As such,  Chinese medicine sometimes uses the same methods to treat similar diseases.

4.The Principles of Treatment
(1) Treating the Cause
(2) “In which good, out within the bad”
Chinese medicine sees illness as a battle between the opposing forces of good and bad. It  parallels the idea of immune system versus bacteria and viruses that is described in Western medicine.
(3) Adjusting Yin and Yang
The caused of illness comes from a tip in the balance of yin and yang, there is too much of one or the other. For this, re-establishing that balance between yin and yang is a basic principle in treating illnesses
(4) Adjusting Organ Functions
The body is a totality and every organ is interdependent upon each other. They interact and influence the health of each other. Thus, the proper monitoring and adjustment of the interrelationship between the body’s organs will produce good results.
(5) Adjusting Chi and Blood
Chi and blood are both essential parts that move throughout the body, they both have their functions and aid each other in the body. Adjusting chi and blood to constantly keep them at an optimal levels is a key to reviving good health.
(6) Differential Treatments According to Circumstance
The cause of illness is affected by many factors, a change of climate, geography, especially the personal make up of the patient are all important factors. For this season, one must consider all of these contingencies when treating a patient. The careful analysis and distinction between these conditions will yield the best treatments.

5. Ancient Chinese Therapeutic Methods:
Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is currently gaining popularity in the United States and at the same time many people are not aware of what TCM truly is. Many people think of Acupuncture as being TCM. This is true, but Acupuncture is just a part of what Traditional Chinese Medicine encompasses. TCM is an art of harmony.
It seeks to eliminate disease by rebalancing and aligning the body with therapeutic methods.
The following methods are part of Traditional Chinese Medicine:

Acupuncture Therapy / Massage (针疗/針療):  We recommend you order to view DVD ofAcupuncture: Clearing Blockages Through The Meridians via Netflix.com Start Your 1
Month Free Trial .
The earliest written record of acupuncture is the Chinese text Shiji (史記, English: Records of the Grand Historian) with elaboration of its history in the second century BCE medical text Huangdi Neijing (黃帝內經, English: Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon).

Acupuncture is the procedure of inserting and manipulating needles into specific points on the patient’s body to relieve pain or for therapeutic purposes. Usually about a dozen points are needled in one session, although the number of needles used may range anywhere from just one or two to 20 or more. The intended effect is to increase circulation and balance energy (Qi) within the body.

The World Health Organization and the United States’ National Institutes of Health (NIH) have stated that acupuncture can be effective in the treatment of neurological conditions and pain.Reports from the USA’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), the American Medical Association (AMA) and various USA government reports have studied and commented on the efficacy of acupuncture. There is general agreement that acupuncture is safe when administered by well-trained practitioners using sterile needles.

Acupuncture works on meridian lines, the so called energy flow lines. Qi, or energy, flows along these lines and can affect health if interrupted with resultant illness. The placement of acupuncture treatment, at various meridian points, can redirect the energy and restore ‘harmony’. It is the restoration of harmony that promotes wellbeing. Energy consists of Yin and Yang. These are the opposites of energy that need to balance. Yin consists of Dark, cold, passive and negative energy where as Yang consists of light, warm, active and positive energy. An Acupuncturist determines the degree of Yin and Yang someone has and uses pressure sites to rebalance these.

Following the growing popularity of Chinese medicine, the ancient practice of acupuncture is starting to gain recognition all over the world. After several millennia of practice, acupuncture has been proven to be fitting for many diseases, highly effective, simple to operate, economical and safe. In the USA, some insurance companies even offer health coverage that includes acupuncture. This is because this method has been proven to be so effective that some patients are able to avoid complex surgical procedures to treat their  ailments and save large amounts of money.

Acupuncture is also rooted within the concept of Jing-Luo (meridians).
Acupuncture divides into two kinds of treatments: needle point and heat. Needle point punctures the skin at certain acupuncture points in order to treat illness. Heat treatment is performed through the subtle effect of burning a wick-like material and radiating that heat at certain points on he body. These two are often used together for optimal results.Acupuncture is widely applicable: the world health organization (WHO) recognizes as many as 47 kinds of diseases that are treatable through acupuncture. Of course, these diseases are also treatable through the use of home electronic physiotherapeutic devices.

Auriculotherapy (耳灼疗法/耳燭療法), which comes under the heading of Acupuncture and Moxibustion.
Chinese food therapy (食疗/食療): Dietary recommendations are usually made according to the patient’s individual condition. The “five flavors” (an important aspect of Chinese herbalism as well) indicate the function of various types of food. A balanced diet, which leads to good health, is when the five functional flavors are in balance. When one is diseased (and therefore unbalanced), certain foods and herbs are prescribed to restore balance to the body.

Chinese herbal medicine (中草药/中药/中藥): In China, herbal medicine is considered as the primary therapeutic modality of internal medicine. Of the approximately 500 Chinese medicinal herbs, 250 or so are commonly used. Rather than being prescribed individually, herbs are formulated to adapt to the specific needs of individual patients. A herbal formula can contain 3 to 25 herbs. As with diet therapy, each herb has one or more of the five flavors/functions and one of five “temperatures” (“Qi”) (hot,
warm, neutral, cool, cold). After the herbalist determines the energetic temperature and functional state of the patient’s body, he or she prescribes a mixture of herbs tailored to balance disharmony. One classic example of Chinese herbal medicine is the use of various mushrooms such as reishi and shiitake, which are currently under intense study by ethnobotanists and medical researchers for immune system enhancement. Unlike Western herbalism, Chinese herbal medicine uses many animal, mineral and mineraloid remedies, and also uses more products from marine sources.

Tuina Therapy (推拿):
Tuina is an integral part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Tuina  is a form of Chinese manipulative therapy often used in conjunction with acupuncture, moxibustion, fire cupping, Chinese herbalism, Tai chi, and Qigong.

In ancient China, medical therapy was often classified into ‘external’ and ‘internal’ treatments. Tuina was one of the external methods, especially suitable for use on the elderly population and on infants. Today it is subdivided into specialized treatment for ‘infants’, ‘adults’, ‘orthopedics’, ‘traumatology’, ‘cosmetology’, ‘rehabilitation’, ‘sports medicine’, etc. Tuina has been used extensively in China for over 2,000 years.

Techniques within the practice of Tuina focus on pressure points located on the body that will have a curative effect on the patient. Tuina is much more specific than general massage in application but the same wonderful relaxing benefits are felt by those who experience this ancient style of bodywork.

Tuina is a hands-on body treatment that uses Chinese taoist and martial art principles to bring the body to balance. The principles being balanced are the eight principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The practitioner may brush, knead, roll/press and rub the areas between each of the joints (known as the eight gates) to open the body’s defensive (wei) chi and get the energy moving in both the meridians and the muscles. Tuina has no side effects unlike many modern drug-based and chemical-based treatments. It has been used to treat or compliment the treatment of many conditions, especially specific musculo-skeletal disorders and chronic stress-related disorders of the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems.

Essentials of Manipulations:
Though there are many schools with various styles and features, the essentials of manipulations are consistent to four adjectives: sustained, forceful, even and gentle, so as to realize the purpose of deep penetration of stimulation. To yield twice the result with half the effort事半功倍, Tuina manipulations must be practiced by following these five essentials.
1. Sustained Movement
It implies, in a considerable period of time, the shape and strength of manipulations should be maintained strictly by following the ruled skill requirements and instructions so as to get enough stimulation for regulating the physiological function and changing pathological states of the body.
2. Forceful Manipulation
It implies, in the process of operation, the manipulations must possess certain force and strength so as to provide enough stimulation. The force and strength from the manipulations denotes the force directly effects on the body surface and also the strength needed to keep continuous movement and certain intensity of stimulation. Forceful manipulation not only means force, it should be a kind of skillful strength, which should be varied according to the individual, operated area, nature of manipulation, condition of disease and body constitution of patient. To maintain enough stimulation for getting a satisfactory therapeutic result without any side effect should be the principle in the application of force.
3. Even Speed and Rhythm
It implies, during the operation, the amplitude, frequency and force of manipulations must be harmonious in a relative way. The manipulations should be performed in a stable speed and full of rhythm.
4. Gentle Way
During the operation, the manipulations are varied from one to another in a smooth and harmonious way. They should be “gentle but not floating; strong but not hesitant”. Here, “gentle” doesn’t mean soft and weak, it implies the force is provided in a harmonious way, not a rough way.
5. Deep Penetration
It implies patient’s reaction to the manipulations and therapeutic effect of the manipulations to the diseases. Though the manipulations are done on body surface, the stimulation and effect must be penetrated deeply into the diseased area.

GuaSha (Scraping/Dermal Friction) Therapy (刮痧):
Gua Sha  is a form of mechanical dermabrasion using a hand-held scraper to irritate and inflame various regions of the JingLuo’s dermal areas. It is frequently used to treat invasion by seasonal external pathogens.
It’s an ancient Chinese medical treatment where they use these sometimes bone plates and rub against your skin. What it does it’s the continuous rubbing of the skin creates heat and your pores opens up when it is opened up there for releases all the waste or toxins in your body.  Most people do this when they have a fever, stomachache, digestive problems, muscle injury, and stress. The red marks looks bad, but it actually shows more toxin. It doesn’t hurt at all. It’s better than meds because its all natural.

Using a traditional specialized tool such as a Gua Sha Board, Gua Sha Slide or other Gua Sha tools, the massage therapist or acupuncturist will gently scrape or rub the skin over a problem area as a deep massage, using a downward direction. A gentle scraping of the skin surface using a GuaSha tool to increase circulation of Qi and blood. It release muscle tension, tightness and constriction.The patient experiences immediate relief from pain, stiffness, fever, chills, coughs, nausea, and so on. Gua Sha is valuable in the prevention and treatment of acute infectious illness, upper respiratory and digestive problems, and many other acute or chronic disorders.
Scrape Governing Vessel (Dou Mai) as it controls all Yang meridians to release cold and wind, soothes away pain.

The intention in Gua Sha is to raise the “rash” or red petechiae through the firm but not violent friction of the tool against the body. Chi or Qi (pronounced “chee”) is the constant and vigorous movement of energy or life force that keeps us healthy and alive. Balancing the Chi, in Traditional Chinese Medicine, promotes blood circulation and the removal of toxic heat, stagnant blood and lymph fluid from the body.

In another words, Guasha means Dermal Friction
What is dermal friction?
Dermal friction therapy (called “gua sha” and pronounced “gwa shaw”) is a method that involves increasing circulation at the surface of the skin by means of “scraping” the skin vigorously with a blunt edged object.

TCM practitioners usually use dermal friction therapy on the back, neck and shoulders, or the fleshy part of the limbs. The practitioner will often first apply a lubricant, such as sesame oil, Vaseline, or tiger balm, to the skin before scraping the area with the smooth, blunt edge of an object, such as a coin or the lip of a juice glass (a ceramic soup spoon is traditionally used in Asia).

Dermal friction therapy is usually done along one or more of the acupuncture channels, in a direction away from the center of the body, in short brisk strokes until the surface of the skin is well reddened, but not broken as shown in the picture.

When is it used?
Practitioners use dermal friction as a way of treating early stage colds and flu, muscle pain, headache, and fever. It is also frequently used as a home remedy in the treatment of fevers associated with colds and flu, and is especially favored in the treatment of children.
Expert Contributor: Christopher Hafner, L.Ac.

IN THE SYSTEM OF TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE, GUA SHA CAN BE USED TO ALLEVIATE THE FOLLOWING:
-      Colds, Congestion
-        Achiness
-        Chronic degenerative diseases
-        Migraines
-        Chronic neck pain
-        Chronic shoulder pain
-        Back pain
-        Bone spurs
-        Strains and sprains
-        Menstrual disorders
-        Insomnia, Fatigue
-        Asthma
-        Carpal tunnel syndrome Stress
-        Muscle aches
-        Flu
-        Shortness of Breath
-        Heart disease
-        Hypertension
-        Sinusitis
-        Ear and eye disorders
-        Chronic infections
-        Sciatica
-        Osteo arthritis
-        Rheumatoid arthritis
-        Bursitis
-        Neuralgia
-        Digestive disorders
-        Skin disorders

THE IMPORTANT ROLE OF QI ACUPUNCTURE & MOXIBUSTION (Click here)

Moxibustion Therapy (Heat Therapy)(灸疗/灸療):
Moxibustion is an herb called mugwort. It may be burned on the handle of the needle, above the skin, on salt or a slice of ginger. This is used to “warm” acupuncture points or areas in order to quicken the healing process.

Moxibustion: “Moxa,” often used in conjunction with acupuncture, consists in burning of dried Chinese mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) on acupoints. “Direct Moxa” involves the pinching of clumps of the herb into cones that are placed on acupoints and lit until warm. Typically the burning cone is removed before burning the skin and is thought, after repeated use, to warm the body and increase circulation. Moxa can also be rolled into a cigar-shaped tube, lit, and held over an acupuncture point, or rolled into a ball and stuck onto the back end of an inserted needle for warming effect.

TCM’s philosophies include Taoism, I-Ching, and partial Buddhism.

Even though TCM is becoming more popular many people use it for pain relief or as a last choice for treatment when other modalities have not given adequate results.
I would like to stress that Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine are holistic prevention and healing systems that can treat complex diseases, chronic internal disorders, and mind body imbalances.

Our goal in creating this website is to share information and increase understanding of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Not only it’s theories, modalities, and application but also how TCM can help prevent and heal. With this information please consider TCM as a choice for your health care needs.

Traditional Chinese Herbs (中药):
Chinese herbal medicine draws from a pharmacopia of thousand of herbs for specific conditions.
Traditional Chinese medicine, also known as TCM, includes a range of traditional medicine practices originating in China. Although well-accepted in the mainstream of medical care throughout East Asia, it is considered an alternative medical system in much of the Western world.

TCM practices include such treatments as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and both Tui na and Shiatsu massage. Qigong and Taijiquan are also closely associated with TCM. Major theories include: Yin-yang, the Five Phases, the human body Meridian/Channel system, Zang Fu organ theory, six confirmations, four levels,  etc. Modern TCM was systematized in the 1950s under the People’s Republic of China and Mao Zedong. Prior to this, Chinese medicine
was mainly practiced within family lineage systems.

Cupping (拔罐):  Using glass or bamboo cups to create a vacuum in order to increase warmth and circulation.
Cupping: A type of Chinese massage, cupping consists of placing several glass “cups” (open spheres) on the body. A match is lit and placed inside the cup and then removed before placing the cup against the skin. As the air in the cup is heated, it expands, and after placing in the skin, cools, creating lower pressure inside the cup that allows the cup to stick to
the skin via suction. When combined with massage oil, the cups can be slid around the back, offering “reverse-pressure massage”.

Qigong (气功/氣功) and related breathing and meditation exercise. Physical Qigong exercises such as Tai chi chuan (Taijiquan 太极拳/太極拳), Standing Meditation (站樁功), Yoga, Brocade BaDuanJin exercises (八段锦/八段錦) and other Chinese martial arts.

Die-da or Tieh Ta (跌打) is usually practiced by martial artists who know aspects of Chinese medicine that apply to the treatment of trauma and injuries such as bone fractures, sprains, and bruises. Some of these specialists may also use or recommend other disciplines of Chinese medical therapies (or Western medicine in modern times) if serious injury is
involved. Such practice of bone-setting (整骨) is not common in the West.
Some TCM doctors may also utilize esoteric methods that incorporate or reflect personal beliefs or specializations such as Fengshui (风水/風水) or Bazi (八字).

6. Treat Acute/Chronic Pain
While acute pain is a sensation triggered by the nervous system to alert you that something in your body needs your attention, chronic pain is different.  Acute pain is your body’s warning system of injury and/or possible illness.  Chronic pain is pain that persists for long periods of time, usually 3 months or more.  The most common chronic pain complaints include: headaches, low back pain, knee pains, arthritic pain, cancer pain and neurogenic pain.

Chronic pain creates a vicious cycle of pain, lack of exercise, fatigue, depression, stress (both physical and emotional), and more pain.  In many cases, the pain greatly changes the quality of the patient’s lives.

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), everything in the body functions dependently on the whole body.  Human body functions are dependent on the life force energy-Qi. Qi and blood flow through the meridian system, nourishing and protecting body tissues and helping them maintain their functions. If, however, the body is beset with disease or injury, normal pathological symptoms will appear and affect the organs and meridians. Once the meridian is blocked, the Qi and blood become stagnant and are not able to move smoothly. As a result, the patient feels pain, tingling, stiffness, bloating, and/or numbness. Hence the old TCM saying, “When there is a blockage, there is pain. Otherwise, there is no pain.”

The meridian system, and its divergent branches, is just like a network that covers the entire body. Each meridian is connected with a specific organ. The organ damage may show up from the meridian, and the local blockage of the meridian can affect the internal organ as well. That is why in TCM, when treating a pain condition, the practitioner rarely focuses on
just the local pain, but also (and more importantly) works to rebalance and harmonize the whole body.

Meridian blockage can be caused by external pathogenic factors such as excessive cold, wind, dampness, dryness, fire (heat) or injury. Meridian blockage can also be caused by internal pathogenic factors that include: emotional factors such as anger, sadness, fear, stress, depression, as well as an internal organ deficiency or malfunction. Determining what exactly is the cause of the pain and which meridian is affected is extremely important in treating both acute and chronic pain. Generally speaking, relieving blood and Qi stasis,
balancing the energy, nourishing the tissue, increasing circulation, and building up deficient organs are all ways that TCM treats pain. Acupuncture is used to correct the flow of Qi and break up stagnation of both Qi and blood; herbal medicine is often used to reestablish and balance Qi, blood and moisture in organ networks to eliminate pathological factors.

Clinical studies clearly support that acupuncture is an effective modality in the treatment of almost all kinds of pain conditions, including, but not limited to, the following: migraines, neuralgia, neck pain, back pain, herniated disc, TMJ, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, bursitis, arthritis, frozen shoulder, shoulder pain, fibromyalgia, dysmenorrhea, osteoporosis, sports and other injuries, surgical pain and even cancer pain. Researchers have discovered beneficial immune and endocrine alterations following acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture may actually help prevent pain by acting on the sympathetic nervous system and by stimulating the body to produce biochemical substances, such as
endorphins, to help reduce pain.

Mesothelioma – Acupuncture has been linked to alleviating the nausea associated with chemotherapy and the pain incurred from the constant surgeries that cancer patients undergo.
The Mesothelioma Center is an up-to-date resource for all mesothelioma (What is Mesothelioma?) issues ranging from mesothelioma statistics to diagnosis options.

References:
Acupuncture.com.  March 2007
Berman BM, Swyers JP. Establish a research agenda for investigating alternative medical interventions for chronic pain. Primary care; Clinics in office practice, 1997; volume 4 (4):
December.
IMC’s concise review. Alternative Medical Therapies For Pain. Overview, 2. Integrative Medicine Communications.
IMC’s Concise Review. Alternative Medicinal Therapies For Pain. Integrative Medicine Communications.
Knardahl S, Elam M, Olausson B, Wallin BG. Sympathetic Nerve Activity After Acupuncture in Humans. 1998; 75 (1): 19-25.

7. Basic Differences between Chinese and Western Medicine   
Western medicine is based on the concepts of physics, biology, and dissection. It operates on the principles of controlling and suppressing germs and viruses in the body through mainly the use of drugs.

After the 1930s, the development of sulphanilamide, Penicillin and the like improved the control of infections. Then, western medicine developed surgery, in-vitro fertilizations, gene recombination and even cloning: all of which demonstrating that western medicine has become mainstream in this century.

Chinese medicine sees man as a part of nature: it has its unique methodologies in diagnosis and treatment. It takes into account not only the physiological conditions of the human body, but its environments, conditions and interactions with the world. This concept is in accordance to the newly published definition of health presented by the World Health
Organization.

However, material, psychological and environmental states change, the nature of human disease has changed at the core.
People are starting to feel the limitations of modern medicine, and this gives rise for an opportunity where Chinese medicine can thrive again in the 21st century.

8. What Is Chinese Massage?

The subtle technique of massage has a long history of more than 5000 years. It is one of the oldest and earliest methods of treatment and health improvement. In the Tang Dynasty, positions of massage therapists and massage doctors were already assigned in palaces to treat the Emperor and his family. Massage treatment is rooted within the concept of Jing-Luo (meridians).Massage therapy is fit to use for seniors, adults, kids and women alike, it is widely applicable and can be used as a personal health maintenance tool. However, this kind of therapy is highly demanding for the practitioner. A massage therapist must be able to apply massage techniques fluidly in accordance with profound knowledge of the human bone structure, vascular system, muscles in the western tradition but also the Jing-Luo (Meridians) and acupuncture points of the Chinese tradition.
Massage works in three ways on the human body.
The first way is by way of mechanics. Applying pressure to the body can improve the circulation of blood and lymphatic fluids, decrease the adhesion of tissue, and eliminate muscle spasms.   For example, Taoist Massage is a spiritual, erotic practice that stimulates and spreads erotic energy throughout the body for the benefit of you as a whole.
Chi Nei Tsang (Taoist Abdominal Massage) is an abdominal massage of Taoist origin which helps to free the energy paths of the lymphatic and circulatory systems.  It is recommended in combination with detoxification and weight balance programs.  Deep, gentle pressure is applied to the upper abdomen to eliminate blockages and tension, thus strengthening the body, restoring vitality, and eliminating chronic pains associated with imbalances in the pelvic and visceral areas.
Chi Nei Tsang is based on the Taoist theory that the ‘gut’ is referred to as a ‘second brain’, this treatment releases the tension and stress stored within the body, thus promoting healing on an emotional level.
The second way is through biology. Here massage is performed on the surface of the body and triggers changes within the nerve endings of the body and increases biological activity of the enzymes and the metabolic system.
At the same time, it should be noted that it is because Chinese medicine sees the relational properties of the body that it loses emphasis on the study of the body itself, and thus cannot establish a more scientific system to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In recent centuries, Chinese medicine has been misunderstood, misused and often ignored.          

The differences between Chinese and western concepts regarding medicine are what mainly attribute to this status.
Lastly, massage works through the unique concepts of Jing-Luo and acupuncture points.

9. What Is Acupuncture?
The origin of acupuncture is Chinese Taoism. Taoism is the philosophical system evolved by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu that advocates a life of complete simplicity, naturalness, and non-interference with the course of natural events in order to attain an existence in harmony with the tao, or life-force.

Acupuncture works on meridian lines, the so called energy flow lines. Qi, or energy, flows along these lines and can affect health if interrupted with resultant illness. The placement of acupuncture treatment, at various meridian points, can redirect the energy and restore ‘harmony’. It is the restoration of harmony that promotes wellbeing. Energy consists of Yin and
Yang. These are the opposites of energy that need to balance. Yin consists of Dark, cold, passive and negative energy where as Yang consists of light, warm, active and positive energy. An Acupuncturist determines the degree of Yin and Yang someone has and uses pressure sites to rebalance these.

Following the growing popularity of Chinese medicine, the ancient practice of acupuncture is starting to gain recognition all over the world. After several millennia of practice, acupuncture has been proven to be fitting for many diseases, highly effective, simple to operate, economical and safe. In the USA, some insurance companies even offer health coverage that includes acupuncture. This is because this method has been proven to be so effective that some patients are able to avoid complex surgical procedures to treat their  ailments and save large amounts of money.
Acupuncture is also rooted within the concept of Jing-Luo (meridians).  (Note: In Chinese Medicine, Jing-Luo means main and collateral channels, regarded as a network of passages, through which energy circulates and along which the acupuncture points are distributed.)
Acupuncture divides into two kinds of treatments: needle point and heat. Needle point punctures the skin at certain acupuncture points in order to treat illness. Heat treatment is performed through the subtle effect of burning a wick-like material and radiating that heat at certain points on he body. These two are often used together for optimal results.
Acupuncture is widely applicable: the world health organization (WHO) recognizes as many as 47 kinds of diseases that are treatable through acupuncture. Of course, these diseases are also treatable through the use of home electronic physiotherapeutic devices.

10. What are Acupuncture Points?
Home electronic physiotherapeutic devices use the methods and techniques of acupuncture and massage to achieve the goal of treatment and maintaining health, this has to do with the knowledge of acupuncture points. Consumers can apply devices to where discomfort arises, but with the knowledge of acupuncture points, can use the techniques and maps offered in this book to achieve professional results at home. Here we offer some basic knowledge regarding acupuncture points.
In the beginning, acupuncture techniques were applied to only areas of pain. At that time, there were no absolute acupuncture points and no names of any kind. As people gained more insightful knowledge of acupuncture points, their features and treatment options, acupuncture points became explicitly defined, named, and hen systematically categorized.
There are three types of acupuncture points.
The first type
is called Jing-Luo points and there are located within the network of Jing-Luo*.  There are 361 different names and 670 specific points.
The second type is outside of Jing-Luo, they are called “wild”.
The third type is “ah” points. These have no particular names, positions or main treatment affects, they are merely the surrounding areas of pain, where the senses are most sensitive.
When touched, the patient usually experiences sharp pain and thus says “ah”, thus these acupuncture points are called “ah” point.

11. Yin Yang Meridians

The 12 Meridians and 366 acupuncture points 十二经络与三百六十六个针灸穴位.     Besides, there are eight strange meridians八个奇经
In the meridian system, there are eight extra meridians which are the Governor Vessel, Conception Vessel, Thoroughfare Vessel, Girdling Vessel, Yin Link Vessel, Yang Link Vessel, Yin Heel Vessel and Yang Heel Vessel. Unlike the twelve regular meridians, these eight channels do not correspond with the organs directly, and only the Governor Vessel and
Conception Vessel have acupuncture points on them. Their main function is to strengthen the links between the twelve regular meridians and also act as reservoirs of the fundamental substances, buffering the blood and qi circulation. They have special relationships with the liver, kidney, uterus, brain and marrow and thus influence these structures physiologically
and pathologically.

For meridians diagrams, Please click here.

12. What Is Qi? (and Other Concepts)
After 2,500 years of evolution, TCM has become a very rich and sophisticated system of rational medicine with a great diversity of theories and applications. But, in its essence, it seeks to understand and facilitate harmony in human life.

It is based on a very simple principle: any system that is in harmony tends towards health, well-being, and sustainability. A system that is in disharmony tends towards illness, disease, suffering, and collapse.

What is a system in TCM?
A system is comprised of everything that creates and sustains it. Everything is interconnected and interdependent. If all of the parts of a system are in harmony with one another, then the whole system is in harmony. Disturb one thing and you create a disturbance that ripples through the whole system.

This principle applies to any and all systems. For example, it applies as equally to a human being as it does to a family, community, or the environment. So we must take care to consider our actions and to take things as a whole.

What are the fundamental concepts?
Two concepts that are unique and fundamental to Chinese medicine are Qi (usually translated as “vital energy”) and yin and yang (the harmony of all the opposite elements and forces that make up existence). These two concepts form what we might call the “roots” of Chinese medicine.

Springing from these roots are the basic principles and theories about the dynamics of Qi and yin and yang, which form the “stems” of Chinese medicine.

And resting on these principles is the rest of TCM theory and application, such as the causes of patterns of disharmony, which form the “branches.”

What is Qi?
TCM starts with the concept of Qi (pronounced “chee”).

Qi is energy in the very broadest sense possible.
Qi is universal.
Qi embraces all manifestations of energy, from the most material aspects of energy (such as the earth beneath your feet, your computer, and flesh and blood) to the most immaterial aspects (light, movement, heat, nerve impulses, thought, and emotion).
Life, it is said in the Chinese medical classics, is a gathering of Qi. A healthy (and happy) human being is a dynamic but harmonious mixture of all the aspects of Qi that make up who we are.
Qi is in a state of continuous flux, transforming endlessly from one aspect of Qi into another. It is neither created nor is it ever destroyed; it simply changes in its manifestation.
In order to talk about the relationships between the various aspects and manifestations of Qi within a given context, Chinese philosophy employs the concept of yin and yang.

13. How does Qi flow in the body?
The TCM Channel System (Jing Luo)
Although Qi permeates every part and every aspect of the body, it tends to collect and travel along pathways called “jing luo.” These are the so-called “meridians” of acupuncture.

The jing luo channel system connects all aspects of the body together into one network of energetic communication.

How does Qi flow in the body?
Just as water flowing through a landscape tends to seek the pathway of least resistance, so Qi flows through the body. The flow of Qi follows the folds and creases of the body’s landscape. It follows the divisions between muscles and the clefts between muscles and bones, collecting in the small hollows and depressions of the body to form pools of Qi.

These “pools of Qi” are places where Qi is concentrated and more accessible. They are the acupuncture points, where Qi can be accessed and manipulated through the use of finger pressure (acupressure), massage techniques (tui na; literally “pinch and pull”), dermal friction (gua sha), cupping, moxibustion (a form of heat therapy), and, of course, acupuncture.
Expert Contributor: Christopher Hafner, L.Ac.